Call Us Toll Free: 866-462-3766   |   Email: sales@oberondesign.com
My Cart (0)

Leather Nook Cover | Hokusai Wave | $74-$76

SKU# NM06

Availability: In stock

$74.00
$74.00

* Required Fields

Quick Overview

NA

click to zoom

More Views

Details
Our handmade covers take 3 - 5 days to bench craft. Find out more about order processing and shipping times.

Identify Your Nook Model

Click Here For Nook HD+ Covers

Videos & Links

Specs

  • SKUs: Nook Tablet - NTBM06; Nook Touch / Glowlight - NCTM06; Nook Color - NC2M06; Nook HD 7 - NHD7M06
  • Colors: Navy, Sky Blue, Teal
  • Weights & Dimensions

Description

  • Corner straps provide 'shake & drop' security.
  • Nook Tablet Only: Cord & tab platform device for horizontal tabletop viewing.
  • Interior spine lined with top grain leather.
  • Case easily folds & stays open.
  • 100% wool felt LED screen protector.
  • Large side pockets & a small pocket for I.D. or cards.
  • Matching Britannia Pewter button.
  • Marine grade replaceable mini bungee cords (includes extra bungee).

Product Tags

Use spaces to separate tags. Use single quotes (') for phrases.

Common questions: Questions about colors? •  Questions about images?Questions about Oberon leather?  •  FAQ’s

 

Hokusai Wave

 

Our wave image is inspired from The Great Wave, a Japanese wood block print by Hokusai (1760-1849) from a series of work entitled, Thirty-six views of Mount Fuji. Hokusai Katsushika was a prolific artist and sensational character influenced by Dutch and French pastoral landscape painters. (Hokusai had discovered copies of European etchings on wrapping papers used to smuggle goods into Japan during the Shogun period, a time when western influences were forbidden.) In turn, Impressionist painters of the late 1800’s, Van Gogh included, were influenced by Hokusai's prints. A man of incredible energy, Hokusai produced over 30,000 works of art, the most accomplished series in his seventies and eighties. He moved 93 times in his life and changed his artistic name more than 30 times. He is best known for being the first to bring the human story into Japanese art.