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Leather Journal Cover | Wild Rose | $60-$76

SKU# JA15

Availability: In stock

$60.00
$60.00

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Our handmade products take 3 - 5 days to bench craft.
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Specs:

  • SKUs: Large Journal - JLA15 / Small Journal - JSA15
  • Colors:  Red, Orchid, Wine
  • Dimensions: Large 6 x 9 inches / Small 5 x 6.875
  • Insert size for large journals is: 5.5 x 8.5 inches with 208 pages
  • Insert size for small journals is: 4.25 x 6.25 inches with 220 pages
  • Weight with book in cover: Large 1.6lb / Small .80lb

Description

  • Matching Britannia Pewter button.
  • Includes a lined template sheet to facilitate writing.
  • Journals come with a book insert.
  • To purchase replacement book fillers, click here: Fillers & Inserts
.
  • Looking for a lined filler?Click on FAQ.
  • Want to use alternative to an Oberon filler? Click on FAQ.

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Common questions: Questions about colors? •  Questions about images?Questions about Oberon leather?  •  FAQ’s

 

Wild Rose

Roses are believed to be 35 million years old. Rosa gallica officinalis growing wild in Asia was first cultivated in the gardens of Persians and Egyptians 5,000 year sago. It wasn't until the late eighteenth century that cultivated roses were introduced into Europe from China where roses were grown in Greek and Roman gardens from which they migrated to France.

Throughout human history roses have come to symbolize love& beauty. But, they have also been claimed as symbols of war and political power especially in regard to the British Empire and a famous conflict know as the War of the Roses. Beloved to gardeners the world over, references to the rose in art and literature abounds, from Shakespeare, “ That which we call a rose by any other name would smell as sweet”, to Robert Burns, “Oh, my luve’s like a red, red rose” and Gertrude Stein, “a rose is a rose is a rose”.